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HOW TO GET AIRPLAY

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Radio airplay is not only excellent publicity for any band or artist, but it also introduces your music to new audiences and can truly break you through to the next level. We’ve put together some tips on how you can start the ball rolling with getting radio airplay for your music and show you a few key ways to get your tracks played on the radio.

Start small & local
National radio play doesn’t tend to come about until you’ve made your mark on local or regional radio stations. So, start there! You will no doubt already be aware of radio stations broadcasting in your area so find out if they air any shows playing music from local emerging acts and if so, who to send it to. Once you’ve identified some local radio shows to target with your songs, take time to tune in or listen back to the programme to make sure your music will fit in. Building a good relationship with a DJ who is keen to champion upcoming artists very worthwhile. Once you’re on their radar (and assuming they like your music, of course!) it is likely they will be keen to show ongoing support by playing new releases, plus there could be opportunities for studio interviews or live sessions as well.
It’s fine to follow up after sending your music to a DJ or show, but leave it a reasonable amount of time, usually 4-6 weeks. Remember, presenters and producers will have loads of submissions they need to listen to, so allow a little time before following up politely.

Targeting unsigned stations, shows & DJs
Another key element you need to think about if you want to get played on the radio, is targeting your specific unsigned stations, shows and DJs who champion new and unsigned acts. There are several UK radio stations and shows dedicated solely to new and emerging African music that you should definitely be tapping into.
● Afrobeats Take Over – The Beat Ldn
● Afro Hits on the Beat – The Beat Ldn
● Afronation – Westside Radio
● Oh So Afro Show – Pulse Radio
● Special Delivery Show – Mystic Radio
● The Afrobeat Plug Show – Colourful Radio
● Stevie Street – Legacy Radio
● ABN Radio
● Rinse FM – Neptizzle
● Reprezent Radio
● Capital xtra
● BBC 1xtra

What to send to radio stations
Whilst there are some few radio shows that will play rough demos on air and offer their feedback, these are few and far between. Generally, you need to send radio stations a finished version of your track and it needs to be a decent quality recording. Swearing and offensive content usually won’t go down well when broadcast so make sure you send radio-friendly versions! Ultimately, a great song will stand out and be in with a chance of getting played, but a professional approach can help you move to the top of the DJ’s listening pile.

Whilst you don’t need to accompany your track with loads of unnecessary additional extras, some brief info will help a DJ get an idea of your background and also provide them with some info to work with when they introduce your track on air. Also mention other stations that have played your tracks, and for local shows, give them details of any upcoming gigs in the area that they may be able to plug.

Radio pluggers
If you’ve already made an impact on a local level, have a release coming up and a budget to spend on promotion, then you can always consider investing in the services of a radio plugger to get you further exposure. It’s essentially their job to help artists and acts get played on the radio. Typically used by record labels to get new releases onto the radio, a radio plugger can also be employed directly by a band or musician to get your music onto national, regional and specialist shows through their established contacts. The relationships with DJs and radio producers that can help shift your music into the mainstream and working with a radio plugger can open doors that you would not be able to alone. Whilst the decision of a radio station to play your music will always come down to the quality of the song, a track put forward by radio plugger will be far more likely to get their attention in the first place.

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Benefits of Going to Live Music Concerts

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Seeing your favourite artist or DJ is such a life-changing and exhilarating experience. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a Spotify compilation or watching their videos on TV or on YouTube, but being in the crowd, packed out in a stadium, or detached from the real world on an underground dance floor it’s taking things to another level.

However, going to a live music concert isn’t all about letting your hair down and having fun, although that’s obviously a considerable part of it. It can benefit you as a person, as well as your overall well-being.

To get you started, here are some benefits that attending live music concerts can bring into your life!

1. Something to Look Forward To
When you’re browsing online, or your friends call you up to tell you that your favourite artist is playing in town, this is where to excitement starts.
From getting a group of friends together to booking the tickets and organising the details to actually attending the event, the feeling of being excited is enough to get you through anything life has to throw at you.

2. A Personal Connection with the Artist
If you’ve ever seen the ‘bonus’ features of a DVD, whether it’s a live show or a film, these are the little extras that you’ll be able to experience at the venue itself. The lead singer or band may like to talk to the audience between songs, giving you a personal insight into the life of the artist, the dynamic of the band or the meaning of a track.

3. Meet New People
When you’re in a concert, your potentially surrounded by thousands of other people who already have a similar interest as you. So, when it comes to meeting new people and starting a conversation, the hard work has already been done for you!
Music is renowned for bringing in feelings of unity and compassion, so what better way to enjoy them than sharing with hundreds of like-minded people!

4. Improving Your Social Connections
When you go to a gig, the chances are that you’ll be going with your mates or family. This is a great activity for everyone to get involved in and it’s safe to say that it’s normally a lot more enjoyable than sitting at home playing a board game or down your local bar.
Going to a gig is a great way to build relationships with the people in your lives and a chance for you all to have a collective memory of something great that you’ll never want to forget.

5. Chance to Appreciate
Hand in hand with the benefit above, going to a concert doesn’t have just to be appreciated in the future but also in the time that you’re there.
Whether you’ve traveled alone, with family, friends or even with strangers, being a concert can feel euphoric and happy to be in the present moment where all the problems of life wash away.

6. Discover New Music
There is a seemingly infinite amount of music out there just waiting for you to discover, but first, you’ve got to find it. When you go to a live music concert of your favourite artist, the chances are that they’ll have one/two support artists going on first.
This is a great way to discover new music that is similar to the music you already like but with their own take on things. Who knows, you might even find a new favourite!
Plus, if you’re a musician yourself, let’s say a beginner guitar player, you can notice what all equipment the opening bands/artists are using. That way, you may come across capable new gear like P90 pickups, distortion pedals, and even short-scale guitars.

7. Find the Inspiration You Need
Have you ever felt like you really want to play an instrument (most feel like playing the guitar) or sing, but you could never find the motivation to learn or to even try it for yourself? Attending a concert can be one of the best ways to spark that level of motivational or inspiration, giving you all the get-up-and-go, you need to start your own musical journey.

8. A Captivating Source of Energy
For those of you who have been to a gig or a concert, meaning you’ve queued up for hours to get in, got your hand stamp or wristband and then walked into the venue, you’ll know what an unbelievable and unmatchable energy you feel when you walk in. This energy releases a huge amount of dopamine into your brain, the chemical for happiness.

9. A Feeling of Togetherness
If you’ve ever been to a concert, you’ll know the sense of togetherness you get from the rest of the crowd. Out of a crowd of 250,000 people, every single one is there for the same reason, and when the crowd erupts for the artist or a favourite song, it’s a sense of community you won’t get anywhere else.

10. A Unique Experience
While on the subject of new experiences, when you play a computer game or see a film, you have engaged in the same experience over and over again. However, a live music concert is one-of-a-kind, and you’ll never be able to re-enact or have that same experience again; a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience.

As you can see, there are so many benefits that attending live music concerts can provide and this is only scratching the surface when it comes to personal level benefits.

Whether you love the atmosphere and energy of a venue, have a gigging partner so that when you have a tradition of attending concerts or just want to hear your favourite artists live, there’s a live music concert opportunity for everybody.

Source: musicoomph

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HOW MUSIC ROYALTIES WORK IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

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How do music royalties work and how to get paid? This guide breaks down the complexities of music royalties and music copyrights in the music industry.

WHAT ARE MUSIC ROYALTIES?

Music royalties are payments that go to recording artists, songwriters, composers, publishers, and other copyright holders for the right to use their intellectual property. There are UK copyright laws that give artists these exclusive rights to their work.

Music Royalties are also generated for various types of licensing and usage. The types of music royalties include mechanical, public performance, synchronisation, and print music. The music industry relies on these royalties as a primary form of payment to musicians. Moreover, contracts define music royalty agreements between the creator and distributor.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF MUSIC ROYALTIES?

There are four different types of music royalties. Each music royalty type also has separate and distinct copyrights. The four sources of royalty revenue in the music industry are:

1. MECHANICAL ROYALTIES

Royalties generated for the physical or digital reproduction and distribution of copyrighted works. This applies to all music formats such as vinyl, CD, cassette, digital downloads, and streaming services. For example, a record label pays a mechanical royalty to a songwriter every time they press a CD of their music.

2. PUBLIC PERFORMANCE ROYALTIES

Royalties generated for copyrighted works performed, recorded, played or streamed in public. This includes radio, television, bars, restaurants, clubs, live concerts, music streaming services, and anywhere else the music plays in public.

Performance Rights Organisations known as PROs often collect performance royalties. PRO organisations such as ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC negotiate licenses for public performances and tracks their usage. They also collect and distribute the royalties generated to the rights holders.

3. SYNCHRONIZATION ROYALTIES (SYNC)

Royalties generated for copyrighted music paired or ‘synced’ with visual media. Sync licenses allow the right to use copyrighted music in films, television, commercials, video games, online streaming, advertisements, and any other type of visual media.

Furthermore, a synchronisation license does not include the right to use an existing recording with audiovisual media. A licensee will also need a master use license before using copyrighted music with a new audiovisual project. This is an agreement between the master recording owner such as a record label and the person seeking permission to use the recording. Any use of protected music in an audiovisual project, whether it’s a full song or short sample, will need a master license as well as a sync license. For example, you need both a sync and master agreement before syncing up the latest Jauz track with your wake boarding video on YouTube.

4. PRINT MUSIC ROYALTIES

Print royalties are the least common form of payment a copyright holder receives. This type of royalty applies to copyrighted music transcribed to a print piece such as sheet music and then distributed. Additionally, these fees are often paid out to the copyright holder based on the number of copies made of the printed piece.

HOW DO MUSIC ROYALTIES WORK?

Music royalties and copyrights is a complex subject. This guide outlines the basic rights and usages of musical compositions.

TYPES OF COPYRIGHTS FOR MUSIC

There are two sides of music copyrights: master rights and publishing rights.

Master rights belong to the owner of a master sound recording. A master recording is an original song or sound used for reproduction and distribution. Master rights usually belong to either the artist(s), record label, recording studio, or any other party that financed the recording.

Publishing rights belong to the owner of the actual musical composition. The publishing side of music refers to the notes, melodies, chords, rhythms, lyrics, and any other piece of original music.

WHO GETS MUSIC ROYALTIES AND ADMINISTERS MUSIC ROYALTIES

The following roles either receive or distribute music royalties for the use of copyrighted music.

1. SONGWRITERS

Songwriters are those who write both the music and lyrics for a song. They receive either mechanical, performance, or sync royalties depending on the usage of their recordings.

2. PUBLISHERS

The publisher is the person or company responsible for ensuring copyright holders receive payment for the use of their music. For example, a music publisher will obtain the copyright from the songwriter in exchange for royalty privileges. They also issue licenses for the use of music they represent as well as collect licensing fees. These fees get split between the publisher and the songwriter.

3. RECORD LABELS

Record labels are responsible for marketing and distributing an artist’s recordings. Generally, they issue contracts that allow them to exploit recordings in exchange for royalty payments over a set length of time. They also often have the master rights to a recorded song, but not the publishing rights. Moreover, record labels generate royalty income from mechanical and performance royalties. The artist then receives a percentage of these royalties.

4. PERFORMANCE ARTISTS

A performing artist is anyone who performs the songwriter’s original work. Performers do not have publishing rights unless they are also the songwriter. Moreover, public performances of copyrighted music generate performance royalties for songwriters. These fees are often collected by the PROs such as ASCAP, BMI, or SESAC.

5. PERFORMING RIGHTS ORGANISATION (PRO)

PROs collect public performance royalties and distribute those fees to the songwriter and music publisher. These organizations also track performances and broadcasting of registered music played in public. The PROs in the United States include ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC.

6. MECHANICAL RIGHTS AGENCY

Mechanical rights agencies manage mechanical licensing rights for the music publisher. They also issue those rights to anyone reproducing and distributing copyrighted musical compositions. These agencies often charge a set percentage of gross royalties collected for their services.

7. SYNC LICENSING AGENCY

Sync licensing agencies acquire the rights from record labels and music publishers to issue licenses for syncing music with visual media. They also distribute royalties for sync licenses to whoever owns the master recording rights.

MUSIC ROYALTIES BREAKDOWN

Various music copyright usages generate royalties. New royalty streams emerge as the music industry and technology continue to evolve.

Additionally, every song has two copyrights. There are copyrights for musical compositions, which consist of the underlying music and any lyrics. The other is copyrights for the “master recording” used for reproduction and distribution.

There is a difference between licensing and royalties. A license gives the right to use a musical composition owned by someone else. While royalties are the payments generated for the use of those compositions.

In general, artists issue exclusive rights to a publishing company for the use of their recordings in exchange for royalties. The music publisher has the right to release the recording or issue rights to either a record label or mechanical rights agency. Additionally, artists can assign the master sound recording copyright to a record label. This agreement allows the label to reproduce, distribute, and license that recording in exchange for royalties.

Furthermore, all parties involved in the production receive a percentage of royalty payments. The royalty amounts are often negotiated up front and then defined in a legally binding agreement.

Source – ICON Collective

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BUILDING A TEAM

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You want to find passionate, self-motivated, driven and competent people to fill each role. Maybe your bassist does graphic design as a hobby and can provide fantastic work for your band. Your drummer may aspire to be a manager one day and want to take on this role until someone better comes along or you need someone more experienced. There is no “right” way to fill these roles, but in the end you need smart, competent people focused on your band’s future. The weakest links in your team always weigh you down. A strong team pushes everyone involved to do their best and raises the quality of everything you do. Recruiting passionate and talented people for all of these positions is one of the most important practices you can do to reach your potential and make something remarkable that fans want to talk about.

Members Of The Team
Below is a list of roles you’ll need to fill to make a team. There is no rule that says each of these roles needs to be a separate person. In fact, when you first start off, you may need to fill all of these roles yourself. As you grow, the demands of each job will become too much work and you’ll need to bring in more help. As you build a fanbase, you should assemble team members who do an exceptional job filling these roles and bring them on as these jobs become too much to handle.

1. Musicians
Until you build a fanbase and can afford to pay people to do most of these jobs, you’re going to have to do them yourself. The musicians you work with are a crucial part of the team and will be responsible for many of these roles until you can afford to bring in other people. This is how you’ll get things done when you’re starting out and keep your costs down. It’s also important to note that if any of the musicians you work with aren’t too wild about doing this work, the rest of the team may start to lose excitement as well. It’s extremely important for the musicians involved to keep their heads up, take on their roles and keep the ship moving forward with enthusiasm so that all other members of the team feel motivated to do their jobs. Otherwise, they will find a more motivated set of musicians to work for and gain greater returns from.

2. Manager
Whenever you get an opportunity, no matter where it comes from, it’s your manager’s job to maximise its potential. Your manager is the hub that connects your team together. They’re the go-to person to make sure everyone is on the same page and keep your strategy coordinated.

Your manager is also responsible for making sure your accounting gets done correctly, that everyone shows up at the right place and that your whole infrastructure is working well. It’s your manager’s job to make sure something gets done even if another team member is slacking off. In the next chapter, the many roles and duties of a manager are discussed more extensively. Your manager is by far the most important member of your team, outside of those you make music with.

3. Booking Agent
One of the hardest team members to find is a good, competent booking agent. Because of this, many musicians are forced to act as their own booking agents. Your booking agent will book your tours, take care of guarantees and submit you to get on tours with other acts. While this member of the team is usually hard to come by, taking this job seriously is do-or-die for a musician whose fanbase is built through live shows.

4. Lawyer  
Once you’re making money and getting new opportunities, you’ll need a lawyer to take care of any contracts that come your way. In general, you’re going to want to deal with a single lawyer for all of your matters. Oftentimes, a band will sign a contract with a lawyer where the lawyer receives a fee on all earnings that the band makes through the lawyer’s help. A lawyer will also shop your music for record deals and licensing.

5. Record Label
If you choose to sign with a record label, they will handle various aspects of your career. In this day and age, this is not the swiss army knife of duties like it used to be. Most labels will usually provide you with a publicist, distribution, some marketing money and–if you’re lucky–radio and video promotion. Most deals will bankroll your recording and help open some new doors for you. Some labels go far beyond these capacities, while others are much less prominent in your career. Every label does things differently and there are few universal standards in recording contracts, making it all the more difficult to assess whether you’re getting a good deal.

While the record deal is thought of as a huge problem solver, these days it’s more of a piece of the puzzle than anything else. If used properly, it can help you advance your career greatly. But if you don’t properly take advantage of your spot on a label’s roster, it won’t do much for you and you’ll be another one of the many musicians who got signed and went nowhere.

6. Distribution
If you don’t sign to a label, you need to get a distributor for your music. Distributors get your music for sale in physical and digital outlets. Many distributors will work to get good placements for musicians who show promise and constantly promote their music. Developing this relationship can do a lot for you.

7. Publicity
Doing publicity is a time-consuming job that takes lots of marketing know-how and relationship building. Writing countless emails and searching out places that will talk about you is a never-ending job. Having someone good at it, with relationships that open doors, is an amazingly valuable asset.

8. Radio Promotion
Promoting to radio is still a huge piece of getting your music to break into the mainstream. Doing this on your own can be difficult unless you just want to focus on smaller radio outlets and online radio. But independent artists can still do it effectively, especially as online radio starts to dwarf terrestrial radio.

9. Video Promotion
Getting your videos promoted can be a huge step in gaining more exposure. While promoting to traditional TV outlets is nearly impossible to do yourself, you can get around this by utilising online video promotion–by far the strongest method for promoting videos today.

10. Graphic Design
While musicians will use the talents of many different designers for various duties throughout their careers, it’s smart to employ one person who can deal with the many graphic needs you’ll have. Websites, advertisements, stickers, merch and album art all need graphic work. This can get expensive fast, so developing a relationship with a talented artist or learning to do it yourself is necessary.

11. Web Development
Sometimes your graphic designer can also be your web developer. No matter what, you’re going to need someone to handle the more complex web coding duties that arise. These duties can also mean developing marketing tools for contests or making you a great website.

12. Publishing/Licensing
Your publisher can do a lot for you in terms of getting placements, licensing deals and making you money through these avenues.

13. Merch Fulfillment
You’re going to need someone to make your merch and send it to people who order it online.

14. Recording Engineer/Producer
While musicians will change this up from record to record, having a constant person who can help you record alternate versions of songs, blog content and provide quick edits for placements is a plus. Learning to do many of these duties for your own music is extremely helpful.

15. Videographer
If you’re going to do YouTube updates, acoustic videos, music videos or any other type of video content, someone is going to have to film and edit them.

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