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Benefits of Going to Live Music Concerts

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Seeing your favourite artist or DJ is such a life-changing and exhilarating experience. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a Spotify compilation or watching their videos on TV or on YouTube, but being in the crowd, packed out in a stadium, or detached from the real world on an underground dance floor it’s taking things to another level.

However, going to a live music concert isn’t all about letting your hair down and having fun, although that’s obviously a considerable part of it. It can benefit you as a person, as well as your overall well-being.

To get you started, here are some benefits that attending live music concerts can bring into your life!

1. Something to Look Forward To
When you’re browsing online, or your friends call you up to tell you that your favourite artist is playing in town, this is where to excitement starts.
From getting a group of friends together to booking the tickets and organising the details to actually attending the event, the feeling of being excited is enough to get you through anything life has to throw at you.

2. A Personal Connection with the Artist
If you’ve ever seen the ‘bonus’ features of a DVD, whether it’s a live show or a film, these are the little extras that you’ll be able to experience at the venue itself. The lead singer or band may like to talk to the audience between songs, giving you a personal insight into the life of the artist, the dynamic of the band or the meaning of a track.

3. Meet New People
When you’re in a concert, your potentially surrounded by thousands of other people who already have a similar interest as you. So, when it comes to meeting new people and starting a conversation, the hard work has already been done for you!
Music is renowned for bringing in feelings of unity and compassion, so what better way to enjoy them than sharing with hundreds of like-minded people!

4. Improving Your Social Connections
When you go to a gig, the chances are that you’ll be going with your mates or family. This is a great activity for everyone to get involved in and it’s safe to say that it’s normally a lot more enjoyable than sitting at home playing a board game or down your local bar.
Going to a gig is a great way to build relationships with the people in your lives and a chance for you all to have a collective memory of something great that you’ll never want to forget.

5. Chance to Appreciate
Hand in hand with the benefit above, going to a concert doesn’t have just to be appreciated in the future but also in the time that you’re there.
Whether you’ve traveled alone, with family, friends or even with strangers, being a concert can feel euphoric and happy to be in the present moment where all the problems of life wash away.

6. Discover New Music
There is a seemingly infinite amount of music out there just waiting for you to discover, but first, you’ve got to find it. When you go to a live music concert of your favourite artist, the chances are that they’ll have one/two support artists going on first.
This is a great way to discover new music that is similar to the music you already like but with their own take on things. Who knows, you might even find a new favourite!
Plus, if you’re a musician yourself, let’s say a beginner guitar player, you can notice what all equipment the opening bands/artists are using. That way, you may come across capable new gear like P90 pickups, distortion pedals, and even short-scale guitars.

7. Find the Inspiration You Need
Have you ever felt like you really want to play an instrument (most feel like playing the guitar) or sing, but you could never find the motivation to learn or to even try it for yourself? Attending a concert can be one of the best ways to spark that level of motivational or inspiration, giving you all the get-up-and-go, you need to start your own musical journey.

8. A Captivating Source of Energy
For those of you who have been to a gig or a concert, meaning you’ve queued up for hours to get in, got your hand stamp or wristband and then walked into the venue, you’ll know what an unbelievable and unmatchable energy you feel when you walk in. This energy releases a huge amount of dopamine into your brain, the chemical for happiness.

9. A Feeling of Togetherness
If you’ve ever been to a concert, you’ll know the sense of togetherness you get from the rest of the crowd. Out of a crowd of 250,000 people, every single one is there for the same reason, and when the crowd erupts for the artist or a favourite song, it’s a sense of community you won’t get anywhere else.

10. A Unique Experience
While on the subject of new experiences, when you play a computer game or see a film, you have engaged in the same experience over and over again. However, a live music concert is one-of-a-kind, and you’ll never be able to re-enact or have that same experience again; a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience.

As you can see, there are so many benefits that attending live music concerts can provide and this is only scratching the surface when it comes to personal level benefits.

Whether you love the atmosphere and energy of a venue, have a gigging partner so that when you have a tradition of attending concerts or just want to hear your favourite artists live, there’s a live music concert opportunity for everybody.

Source: musicoomph

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HOW MUSIC ROYALTIES WORK IN THE MUSIC INDUSTRY

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How do music royalties work and how to get paid? This guide breaks down the complexities of music royalties and music copyrights in the music industry.

WHAT ARE MUSIC ROYALTIES?

Music royalties are payments that go to recording artists, songwriters, composers, publishers, and other copyright holders for the right to use their intellectual property. There are UK copyright laws that give artists these exclusive rights to their work.

Music Royalties are also generated for various types of licensing and usage. The types of music royalties include mechanical, public performance, synchronisation, and print music. The music industry relies on these royalties as a primary form of payment to musicians. Moreover, contracts define music royalty agreements between the creator and distributor.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF MUSIC ROYALTIES?

There are four different types of music royalties. Each music royalty type also has separate and distinct copyrights. The four sources of royalty revenue in the music industry are:

1. MECHANICAL ROYALTIES

Royalties generated for the physical or digital reproduction and distribution of copyrighted works. This applies to all music formats such as vinyl, CD, cassette, digital downloads, and streaming services. For example, a record label pays a mechanical royalty to a songwriter every time they press a CD of their music.

2. PUBLIC PERFORMANCE ROYALTIES

Royalties generated for copyrighted works performed, recorded, played or streamed in public. This includes radio, television, bars, restaurants, clubs, live concerts, music streaming services, and anywhere else the music plays in public.

Performance Rights Organisations known as PROs often collect performance royalties. PRO organisations such as ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC negotiate licenses for public performances and tracks their usage. They also collect and distribute the royalties generated to the rights holders.

3. SYNCHRONIZATION ROYALTIES (SYNC)

Royalties generated for copyrighted music paired or ‘synced’ with visual media. Sync licenses allow the right to use copyrighted music in films, television, commercials, video games, online streaming, advertisements, and any other type of visual media.

Furthermore, a synchronisation license does not include the right to use an existing recording with audiovisual media. A licensee will also need a master use license before using copyrighted music with a new audiovisual project. This is an agreement between the master recording owner such as a record label and the person seeking permission to use the recording. Any use of protected music in an audiovisual project, whether it’s a full song or short sample, will need a master license as well as a sync license. For example, you need both a sync and master agreement before syncing up the latest Jauz track with your wake boarding video on YouTube.

4. PRINT MUSIC ROYALTIES

Print royalties are the least common form of payment a copyright holder receives. This type of royalty applies to copyrighted music transcribed to a print piece such as sheet music and then distributed. Additionally, these fees are often paid out to the copyright holder based on the number of copies made of the printed piece.

HOW DO MUSIC ROYALTIES WORK?

Music royalties and copyrights is a complex subject. This guide outlines the basic rights and usages of musical compositions.

TYPES OF COPYRIGHTS FOR MUSIC

There are two sides of music copyrights: master rights and publishing rights.

Master rights belong to the owner of a master sound recording. A master recording is an original song or sound used for reproduction and distribution. Master rights usually belong to either the artist(s), record label, recording studio, or any other party that financed the recording.

Publishing rights belong to the owner of the actual musical composition. The publishing side of music refers to the notes, melodies, chords, rhythms, lyrics, and any other piece of original music.

WHO GETS MUSIC ROYALTIES AND ADMINISTERS MUSIC ROYALTIES

The following roles either receive or distribute music royalties for the use of copyrighted music.

1. SONGWRITERS

Songwriters are those who write both the music and lyrics for a song. They receive either mechanical, performance, or sync royalties depending on the usage of their recordings.

2. PUBLISHERS

The publisher is the person or company responsible for ensuring copyright holders receive payment for the use of their music. For example, a music publisher will obtain the copyright from the songwriter in exchange for royalty privileges. They also issue licenses for the use of music they represent as well as collect licensing fees. These fees get split between the publisher and the songwriter.

3. RECORD LABELS

Record labels are responsible for marketing and distributing an artist’s recordings. Generally, they issue contracts that allow them to exploit recordings in exchange for royalty payments over a set length of time. They also often have the master rights to a recorded song, but not the publishing rights. Moreover, record labels generate royalty income from mechanical and performance royalties. The artist then receives a percentage of these royalties.

4. PERFORMANCE ARTISTS

A performing artist is anyone who performs the songwriter’s original work. Performers do not have publishing rights unless they are also the songwriter. Moreover, public performances of copyrighted music generate performance royalties for songwriters. These fees are often collected by the PROs such as ASCAP, BMI, or SESAC.

5. PERFORMING RIGHTS ORGANISATION (PRO)

PROs collect public performance royalties and distribute those fees to the songwriter and music publisher. These organizations also track performances and broadcasting of registered music played in public. The PROs in the United States include ASCAP, BMI, and SESAC.

6. MECHANICAL RIGHTS AGENCY

Mechanical rights agencies manage mechanical licensing rights for the music publisher. They also issue those rights to anyone reproducing and distributing copyrighted musical compositions. These agencies often charge a set percentage of gross royalties collected for their services.

7. SYNC LICENSING AGENCY

Sync licensing agencies acquire the rights from record labels and music publishers to issue licenses for syncing music with visual media. They also distribute royalties for sync licenses to whoever owns the master recording rights.

MUSIC ROYALTIES BREAKDOWN

Various music copyright usages generate royalties. New royalty streams emerge as the music industry and technology continue to evolve.

Additionally, every song has two copyrights. There are copyrights for musical compositions, which consist of the underlying music and any lyrics. The other is copyrights for the “master recording” used for reproduction and distribution.

There is a difference between licensing and royalties. A license gives the right to use a musical composition owned by someone else. While royalties are the payments generated for the use of those compositions.

In general, artists issue exclusive rights to a publishing company for the use of their recordings in exchange for royalties. The music publisher has the right to release the recording or issue rights to either a record label or mechanical rights agency. Additionally, artists can assign the master sound recording copyright to a record label. This agreement allows the label to reproduce, distribute, and license that recording in exchange for royalties.

Furthermore, all parties involved in the production receive a percentage of royalty payments. The royalty amounts are often negotiated up front and then defined in a legally binding agreement.

Source – ICON Collective

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BUILDING A TEAM

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You want to find passionate, self-motivated, driven and competent people to fill each role. Maybe your bassist does graphic design as a hobby and can provide fantastic work for your band. Your drummer may aspire to be a manager one day and want to take on this role until someone better comes along or you need someone more experienced. There is no “right” way to fill these roles, but in the end you need smart, competent people focused on your band’s future. The weakest links in your team always weigh you down. A strong team pushes everyone involved to do their best and raises the quality of everything you do. Recruiting passionate and talented people for all of these positions is one of the most important practices you can do to reach your potential and make something remarkable that fans want to talk about.

Members Of The Team
Below is a list of roles you’ll need to fill to make a team. There is no rule that says each of these roles needs to be a separate person. In fact, when you first start off, you may need to fill all of these roles yourself. As you grow, the demands of each job will become too much work and you’ll need to bring in more help. As you build a fanbase, you should assemble team members who do an exceptional job filling these roles and bring them on as these jobs become too much to handle.

1. Musicians
Until you build a fanbase and can afford to pay people to do most of these jobs, you’re going to have to do them yourself. The musicians you work with are a crucial part of the team and will be responsible for many of these roles until you can afford to bring in other people. This is how you’ll get things done when you’re starting out and keep your costs down. It’s also important to note that if any of the musicians you work with aren’t too wild about doing this work, the rest of the team may start to lose excitement as well. It’s extremely important for the musicians involved to keep their heads up, take on their roles and keep the ship moving forward with enthusiasm so that all other members of the team feel motivated to do their jobs. Otherwise, they will find a more motivated set of musicians to work for and gain greater returns from.

2. Manager
Whenever you get an opportunity, no matter where it comes from, it’s your manager’s job to maximise its potential. Your manager is the hub that connects your team together. They’re the go-to person to make sure everyone is on the same page and keep your strategy coordinated.

Your manager is also responsible for making sure your accounting gets done correctly, that everyone shows up at the right place and that your whole infrastructure is working well. It’s your manager’s job to make sure something gets done even if another team member is slacking off. In the next chapter, the many roles and duties of a manager are discussed more extensively. Your manager is by far the most important member of your team, outside of those you make music with.

3. Booking Agent
One of the hardest team members to find is a good, competent booking agent. Because of this, many musicians are forced to act as their own booking agents. Your booking agent will book your tours, take care of guarantees and submit you to get on tours with other acts. While this member of the team is usually hard to come by, taking this job seriously is do-or-die for a musician whose fanbase is built through live shows.

4. Lawyer  
Once you’re making money and getting new opportunities, you’ll need a lawyer to take care of any contracts that come your way. In general, you’re going to want to deal with a single lawyer for all of your matters. Oftentimes, a band will sign a contract with a lawyer where the lawyer receives a fee on all earnings that the band makes through the lawyer’s help. A lawyer will also shop your music for record deals and licensing.

5. Record Label
If you choose to sign with a record label, they will handle various aspects of your career. In this day and age, this is not the swiss army knife of duties like it used to be. Most labels will usually provide you with a publicist, distribution, some marketing money and–if you’re lucky–radio and video promotion. Most deals will bankroll your recording and help open some new doors for you. Some labels go far beyond these capacities, while others are much less prominent in your career. Every label does things differently and there are few universal standards in recording contracts, making it all the more difficult to assess whether you’re getting a good deal.

While the record deal is thought of as a huge problem solver, these days it’s more of a piece of the puzzle than anything else. If used properly, it can help you advance your career greatly. But if you don’t properly take advantage of your spot on a label’s roster, it won’t do much for you and you’ll be another one of the many musicians who got signed and went nowhere.

6. Distribution
If you don’t sign to a label, you need to get a distributor for your music. Distributors get your music for sale in physical and digital outlets. Many distributors will work to get good placements for musicians who show promise and constantly promote their music. Developing this relationship can do a lot for you.

7. Publicity
Doing publicity is a time-consuming job that takes lots of marketing know-how and relationship building. Writing countless emails and searching out places that will talk about you is a never-ending job. Having someone good at it, with relationships that open doors, is an amazingly valuable asset.

8. Radio Promotion
Promoting to radio is still a huge piece of getting your music to break into the mainstream. Doing this on your own can be difficult unless you just want to focus on smaller radio outlets and online radio. But independent artists can still do it effectively, especially as online radio starts to dwarf terrestrial radio.

9. Video Promotion
Getting your videos promoted can be a huge step in gaining more exposure. While promoting to traditional TV outlets is nearly impossible to do yourself, you can get around this by utilising online video promotion–by far the strongest method for promoting videos today.

10. Graphic Design
While musicians will use the talents of many different designers for various duties throughout their careers, it’s smart to employ one person who can deal with the many graphic needs you’ll have. Websites, advertisements, stickers, merch and album art all need graphic work. This can get expensive fast, so developing a relationship with a talented artist or learning to do it yourself is necessary.

11. Web Development
Sometimes your graphic designer can also be your web developer. No matter what, you’re going to need someone to handle the more complex web coding duties that arise. These duties can also mean developing marketing tools for contests or making you a great website.

12. Publishing/Licensing
Your publisher can do a lot for you in terms of getting placements, licensing deals and making you money through these avenues.

13. Merch Fulfillment
You’re going to need someone to make your merch and send it to people who order it online.

14. Recording Engineer/Producer
While musicians will change this up from record to record, having a constant person who can help you record alternate versions of songs, blog content and provide quick edits for placements is a plus. Learning to do many of these duties for your own music is extremely helpful.

15. Videographer
If you’re going to do YouTube updates, acoustic videos, music videos or any other type of video content, someone is going to have to film and edit them.

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THE ARTIST MANAGER RELATIONSHIP

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The artist-manager relationship is a fragile one. It’s based primarily on blind faith, trust, and lots of hard work. And even then nothing is for certain. It takes years to develop a relationship with a manager that transcends mere career goals and segues into the private lives of the artists.

A good starting point is honesty. If, during your relationship, you eventually want to call your manager, “friend,” then you both need to establish a totally honest forum from day one.
Totally honest means that as a manager, you can and must tell an artist that his new song sucks if indeed it does suck. And as the artist, you must accept that criticism and not flip out or take it as a personal insult. By doing so, you have taken the first step toward piercing each other’s outer layer and have moved one step closer to touching the nerve centre of the relationship.
You and your manager are together because you both feel a common bond: the music, the spirit, the attitude, and the personalities. If your manager drops the ball, understand that he is human and though he may have had a bad day, tomorrow might bring him (and therefore, you), closer to achieving your mutual goals.
Sharing common experiences between manager and artist is a surefire way to break the plane and cross from business to pleasure. If your manager is so inclined, hanging out at rehearsal sessions, recording dates, or even jumping into the van for a whistle-stop tour, is likely to do the trick. But only when the timing is right.

Not every manager wants to enjoy the company of his artists after hours. Some need to clock-out at the end of the business day and put work on hold until morning. Then, there are others, who so enjoy their artists, both as creative entities and as people, that the mixture of business and pleasure goes almost unnoticed. It becomes one.

BENEFITS OF HAVING A MANAGER
Before thinking about getting an artist manager, it’s important to set goals and strategies of where you plan to go. For instance, do your goals involve becoming a renowned local artist guaranteed to sell out a small venue, or do you aim to become a global celebrity? Remember to keep these aims realistic in relevance to the appeal of your music.

Exposure
Your manager will help expose you to the masses, using his/her contacts to help gain such things as: gigs, reviews, attention from record labels, and further helpful platforms to push and promote YOU as an artist. After all, the manager’s name is associated with your act, so they will want to promote and expose you as much as possible in a mutually beneficial way. There is often no limit to a managers contact list, and this is arguably the most useful aspect, having awareness raised about your artist within the industry as well as to the public.Since networking is one of the key factors in the success of an artist, it is massively helpful to have someone on your team who has been building those relations for years.

Thinking about the next step
A manager will deal with the everyday logistics of thinking about the next step and appropriate career moves for you as an artist. In relevance to the ‘exposure’ section previously explained, this next step may include: contacting a music PR agency to create a promotional campaign for a single/album release, getting in touch with a booking agency to help with the booking of gigs/live shows, or contacting a producer with the decision of recording some material in the studio. These are just a number of examples to evident the non-limiting boundaries of an artist manager. A manager can also help with the decision and encourage what to release next with the consideration of industry and public appeal.

Day-to-day operations
Although a constant thought about the next step, a manager will deal with the day-to-day operations for the artist. The manager will be the voice of the artist, responsible for speaking for them in order to make the correct moves. This will include dealing with those that get in touch, which may include: gig offers, blogs asking to feature the artist, and any other industry attention as previously mentioned. As the voice of the artist, it’s very important for the manager and artist to have a positive relationship and be on the same ‘wavelength’. This will ensure the right decisions will be made with no confusion or conflict. It’s hard to develop as an artist if your manager does not understand your ambitions so its highly important to bond and have a good relationship, after all this will affect the health of your career as an artist.

Advancing your career
An artist manager has the ability to efficiently and effectively advance your career as an artist to the next level and beyond. By creating connections within the industry and keeping these consistently intact, advancing to the next level becomes increasingly viewable. A manager should understand your needs and desires and therefore will help to find you a well-matched and meaningful record label. As the industry attention floods in, your manager will help to deal with this by replying with appropriate action in the most professional way, helping to create a positive name for the artist within the music industry. Here’s another article where you can read about how you can develop your career on your own.

Organisation
Similarly to a manager role within any occupation, an artist manager will help to keep you organised and on schedule. This becomes increasingly helpful in such situations as national tours – knowing where to be and when, as well as keeping you together as an artist by working with you hand-in-hand, as opposed to you working for them. This means that the artist can put their main focuses on what artists do best: performing live, creating a good show, and recording new material.

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